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20100905
20100905
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
claims iran may be financing attacks by the taliban against u.s. interests in afghanistan. according to the sunday times in london, taliban militants are getting paid thousands to carry out these attacks. nbc's tom aspell is in kabul with the latest. tom with a good day to you, what can you tell us? >> well, the british sunday times says one of its reporters has met with a taliban treasurer from wardak province west of kabul who makes regular trips into kabul to go to five iranian construction companies which then give him cash to carry back to the shadowed governor of wardak province, who distributes the money to taliban fighters. they each get paid about $200 a month and are given a bonus of a thousand dollars if they kill an american and $6,000 if they destroy an armored vehicle belonging to the americans. now the "sunday times" says these companies have been in existence about six months, take money from foreign donors, for reconstruction projects, send the profits back to tehran by the banking system and return some of the money to kabul to be distributed to the taliban treasure
others to move with us. a little background. the threat. it is changing. since the end of the cold war, while the chances of an all-out global nuclear war have declined significantly, thank god, i think the chances of a nuclear strike have increased. during the cold war, the american, nato, and soviet military's were diligent and professional in the way we handle our nuclear-weapons. but we were also very lucky. we had several near misses, including but not limited to the cuban missile crisis. if we think that our luck will hold out with nine nuclear states and growing, plus the spread of technology to enrich the new clear -- and rich uranium, i think the world must think i knew. nine countries have nuclear weapons now. more are seeking them. terrorists are seeking nuclear weapons and nuclear. -- and i have no doubt that certain groups would use them if they had them. the know-how and capability to build a nuclear weapon is widely available, something we thought would only be the province of nations years ago. but it has changed. with the goal of nuclear power, and we will be talking a
to middle east peace. and struggles to find a voice on the economy. >> can you guys still hear us? >> analysis from the "roundtable" with george will, thomas friedman. paul krugman, and mary jordan. >>> and "the sunday funnies." >> it's labor day. one day a year, we honor our workforce. do we still have a workforce? i don't know. do we? >>> today marks a new beginning for "this week." through our partnership with the bbc, we're delighted that as of now, this program is being broadcast globally in more than 200 countries. we begin with one of the most polarizing figures on the international stage, tony blair. this week, the former british prime minister released his memoir, "a journey" and we sat down for his first north american interview. during ten tumultuous years -- at the center of world events, the iraq war is his most controversial legacy. this week, anti-war protesters showed up in force in dublin at the former prime minister's book signing. as well as taking his country to war in iraq and afghanistan, his interventions in kosovo, sierra leone. and northern ireland brought
to overcome than others. so, this might be the case in the us where the pet food scandals, the melamine scandals certainly generated very, very high attention in the press and in the media. >>reporter: the reality of the "made in china" curse isn't lost on aigo, a popular maker of usb memory sticks, mp6 players and digital cameras. as an olympics and formula one sponsor, aigo enjoys a high profile in mainland china. but its chairman accepts that to be credible, globally, the bar for chinese companies is high, and so, until aigo has a strong overseas service network, he's holding-off on expanding abroad. >>feng: many, many companies want to sell products fast, but no service! it's a disaster for brands. because only if you have good service, you can give satisfaction to the consumer. so we need a partner. >>reporter: chinese exporters like white goods maker haier and beer maker tsingtao are strongly focused on service and brand awareness. that's why they're on the short list at foreigners might recognise. other players have raised their profiles by making big ticket acquisitions - like l
. this is a huge clue that could tell us what caused america's worst environmental disaster. here's matt gutman. >> reporter: like some mangled creature raised from the deep this million-pound mass of steel could tell the story of what went wrong on april 20th and who is to blame for the worst spill in u.s. history and the deaths of 11 men. >> bringing this to a conclusion for the investigation to move forward for the families is a major, major thing for the memories of them 11 men. >> reporter: the busted blow-out preventer or b.o.p., is such a key piece of evidence that the fbi documented every step of its slow rise to the surface and agents will remain with it even as it's hauled to an ultra security nasa installation. forensic teams from a half dozen agencies will scrutinize every inch of it. >> what they'll be looking for is why the sort of last-ditch measure didn't work. >> reporter: five stories high, the b.o.p. was a series of valves and ramps designed to slam shut in the event of a leak, the last line of defense. but as we learned at the the blow-out prevention center this was not one
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)